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Posts Tagged ‘gender’

A city for women only by Natasha Mitchell and Adel Abdel Ghafar

In Asia, audio, gender, human rights, politics, sexuality, society on November 5, 2012 at 21:16

From: A city for women only by Natasha Mitchell and Adel Abdel Ghafar, Life Matters, ABC Radio National, http://www.abc.net.au

A new women-only industrial city dedicated to female workers is set to be built in the so-called shrouded kingdom of the Middle-East: Saudi Arabia.

It may come as a surprise to some, given Saudi Arabia attracts much criticism from human rights groups for its systematic discrimination against women. Saudi women are subject to the kingdom’s strict customs which mean they are unable to vote, drive or sign a legal document.

So does the proposed development represent a move by the government toward achieving independence for women, or is there another incentive?

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Reposted with permission from: ABC Radio National

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Women less likely to endorse independence in gender-unequal societies (phys.org)

In anthropology, culture, gender, politics, society on July 3, 2012 at 18:08

 

From: Women less likely to endorse independence in gender-unequal societies, phys.org, http://phys.org/news

Women in countries with great gender inequality are more likely than men to support authoritarian values, according to a new study of 54 countries. The shift away from beliefs in independence and freedom is the result, social psychologists say, of authoritarianism helping such women cope with a threatening environment.

“If a person is authoritarian, they are more likely to follow what group leaders ask them to do, and to follow the crowd more generally,” says Mark Brandt of DePaul University in Chicago, a co-author of the paper just published online in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. Prior research has found that adopting authoritarian beliefs gives people a sense of connection to others and protection against threats. “It might be one way to compensate for the social devaluing that is associated with being a member of a disadvantaged group.”

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The Objectification of Women. A Conversation with Martha Nussbaum by Patricia Gras & Rose Mary Salum

In civilisation, ethnicity, gender, interview, philosophy, psychology on July 1, 2012 at 02:24

 

From: The Objectification of Women. A Conversation with Martha Nussbaum by Patricia Gras & Rose Mary Salum, LITERAL, http://www.literalmagazine.com

… I have studied the emotion of disgust a lot. Research on disgust shows that all of us are uncomfortable with the signs that mirror animals, that show we are mortal. And so the bodily fluids, the corpse, all of those things that psychologists call “animal reminders,” are heavily avoided. They are viewed as contaminating and they are stigmatized. In a second step, people who somehow come to represent those stigmatized things, fluids, decay and so on, are subordinated as a result. Now, in many cultures it seems pretty arbitrary how those groups get constructed in that role, maybe it is because of fear or anxiety, sometimes it is Jews, sometimes it is lower castes in Indian society, sometimes Muslims in India today, but women, in more or less all cultures, come in for that kind of projected disgust, as I put it. That is to say they are associated with the things about the body that are feared and viewed as contaminating because they give birth but also because they are seen as sights of fluid, the menstrual period, they are also seen as the receptacles of male semen, which is something that males feel anxious about. For all these reasons, the researchers who work on disgust think that misogyny is connected ultimately with people’s own anxiety about their own bodies.

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VIDEO: Sexual Abuse: Burden of Silence

In gender, law, sexuality, society, video on June 17, 2012 at 16:36

 

From: Sexual Abuse: Burden of Silence, Documentary.net, http://documentary.net

One in three Native American women will experience sexual abuse at some point in their lifetime. That is more than twice the national average. And for the women of Alaska, the US state with the highest incidence of rape, the situation is particularly bleak. Donna Erikson is a Native Alaskan woman and a survivor of sexual abuse. She, and those who share this devastating history, are now embracing the transformative power of lifting the burden of silence within their community by speaking out about sexual assault. In Burden of Silence we hear her story and see, through the work of a Native Alaskan state trooper, the challenging reality of law enforcement for a crime that is so frequently hushed up by victim and victimiser alike.

Watch the video

Disclaimer from the website: Yes it is free and legal. Films are provided by the filmmakers or rights-holders themselves. Or they claim their copyright protected contents on YouTube and monetize it (like National Geographic).

 

The hijab or the bikini: the shaping of young girls’ sexuality

In culture, gender, society, sociology on May 17, 2012 at 11:05

 

The hijab or the bikini: the shaping of young girls’ sexuality – Rahila Gupta – opendemocracy.net

Dr Anat Scolnicov, a law academic, demonstrates that ‘parents have a presumptive right to determine their offspring’s religious identity’ by analysing legal approaches to adoption, an extreme case scenario when the child loses its connection with the birth family, and yet attempts are made to retain its original religious identity. In Britain, social workers are obliged to take into account ethnic, cultural, linguistic and religious factors. Scolnicov argues that ‘Protection of religious identity is rarely protection of the exercise of individual choice.’  It is about protection of group rights over individual rights. In some rare cases such as the children of the Australian aboriginal community or Native Americans, who have been decimated by genocide, the community might cease to exist if their children were consistently adopted by outsiders. But these are ethnic and cultural questions rather than religious ones. However, the argument that the community will be decimated is used by some Muslims in support of their right to veil their children. A Muslim mother fears that, “Our enemies understand only too well that our children represent the future of Islam in the West, a future they wish to extinguish. So it’s not surprising, that in this war on Islam our enemies attack our children and their right to Islam”.

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