anagnori

Archive for the ‘audio’ Category

AUDIO: Cornel West on Emerson’s Enduring Importance

In audio, literature, North America, philosophy on July 24, 2015 at 05:36

From: Cornel West on Emerson’s Enduring Importance by Radio Open Source, http://www.radioopensource.org

Emerson is called the founder of the American religion, sometimes the American God, and surely he’s the voice of American individualism in “Self Reliance.” A man should learn to detect and watch that gleam of light which flashes across his mind from within,” Emerson wrote, “Trust thyself: Every heart vibrates to that iron string.”

Cornel West, like Emerson, is a preacher with a national audience, and without a church. Emerson is his number one American writer, a soulful modern and a model public philosopher.

This podcast is a short excerpt from Emerson Redux, a full hour show on Ralph Waldo Emerson created in 2006.

Listen to the podcast

Reposted according to copyright notice from: Radio Open Source

Advertisements

AUDIO: Sounding the Sea by Conor Gillies

In art, audio, music on October 13, 2014 at 23:50

From: Sounding the Sea by Conor Gillies, Radio Open Source, http://radioopensource.org

… Adams downplays the politics of Become Ocean, which had its debut in June under the commission of the Seattle Symphony Orchestra and its music director, Ludovic Morlot, and won the Pulitzer Prize for music this year. “Too often political art fails as both art and politics,” he says. Adams goes on:

Art needs no justification other than itself. Yet, I also believe that music can serve as a sounding model for the renewal of human consciousness and human culture and that it can invite us to listen more deeply to expand our awareness of this miraculous world that we live in.

So like everybody these days I think a lot, I think all the time, about climate change, and as I composed Become Ocean I had very much in my mind images of the melting of the polar ice and the rising of the seas. But I hope it transcends any metaphors, transcends its title, to become a purely musical world of its own.

The immense musical world of Become Ocean borrows its title from a tiny mesostic poem John Cage wrote in honor of his friend and fellow composer, Lou Harrison. “It’s a beautiful little poem in which Cage likens Lou’s music to a river in delta. And I just loved that image of listening, of music, as a stream that leads us toward oceanic consciousness,” Adams says.

The Cage connection goes beyond the name. Musically, Adams draws most directly from the post-war American avant-garde, including Cage and Morton Feldman. Like these artists, Adams is fascinated with fluidity: how sound and the environment blend.

“I’ve been obsessed, well, all my creative life with place as music but also music as place,” Adams says.

Water and landscape have long been themes of the John Cage school of minimalist music, and of Adams’ own career; Become Ocean follows Adams’ Dark Waves, a slow, slate-blue-colored piece for orchestra and electronics, from 2007.

Listen to John Luther Adams

Reposted according to copyright notice from: Radio Open Source

Amiri Baraka: Ennobled by Coltrane

In art, audio, music, North America, poetry, writers on January 12, 2014 at 00:42

From: Amiri Baraka: Ennobled by Coltrane, Radio Open Source, http://www.radioopensource.org

Christopher Lydon talks to Amiri Baraka: Listen to the interview

barakaAmiri Baraka‘s death prompts me to repost a conversation we had about the music of John Coltrane, which inspired Baraka and ennobled the ambitions of his Black Arts movement. “Trane was our flag,” Baraka remembered back in 2007. “We could feel what he was doing. We heard our own search and travail in the opening of ‘Giant Steps.’”

In the summer of 1957 the poet then known as Leroi Jones chanced to live over the Five Spot in Manhattan when Coltrane and Thelonius Monk had a five-month learning-by-doing gig on the Bowery. Willem de Kooning and Jack Kerouac were also among the listeners and drinkers at the Five Spot. Baraka told me he missed barely a session of the music that culminated in the Monk-Coltrane Carnegie Hall concert in November, 1957 — a Blue Note best-seller only after the Library of Congress unearthed the tapes in 2005. This was early, lyrical Coltrane, at the dawn of the civil-rights era — “the rebellion” in Baraka’s phrasing, then and ever — for which Coltrane became a sort of soundtrack. For Baraka, Coltrane’s “My Favorite Things” planted a bomb inside the sentimentality of Richard Rodgers and “The Sound of Music.” The hostility in Baraka’s listening had softened a lot by 2007, but Coltrane was still perhaps his highest representation of black art with social traction. Baraka follows Coltrane to the yowling last recordings — Coltrane’s ultimate showdown with self and life — with a shudder of shared pain. But if that is what Coltrane wanted us to hear, serious devotees have no choice. “You have to listen to it.”

“Ironic thing is,” Baraka said, “when I was locked up in 1967 in the rebellion in Newark, I found I was listening all the time to Coltrane’s tunes. And then late one afternoon, the jailer came by — it was July 17, 1967 — and said ‘your man Coltrane died today.’ When I was locked up. That amazed me!”

Reposted according to copyright notice from: Radio Open Source

The Philosopher and the Wolf with Alan Saunders

In animals, audio, ethics, humanities, interview, philosophy on December 9, 2013 at 20:03

From: The Philosopher and the Wolf with Alan Saunders, The Philosopher’s Zone, ABC Radio National, http://www.abc.net.au

Alan Saunders: Hi, I’m Alan Saunders, and this week on The Philosopher’s Zone we’re going to the Sydney Writers’ Festival for a conversation with Mark Rowlands, Welsh-born and now a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Miami.

As a philosopher, he’s concerned with the philosophy of mind and cognitive science, with applied ethics, and with bringing philosophy to a wider audience.

Well he certainly reached a wide audience with his book The Philosopher and the Wolf, an account of the 11 years he spent with Brenin, the wolf, whom he bought when he was an Assistant Professor at the University of Alabama and Brenin was an exuberant, destructive puppy.

Brenin went everywhere with Mark. He had to, because it wasn’t good for the furniture if he were left alone at home. And he travelled in the US, Ireland, England and France.

And what lessons did the philosopher learn from the wolf? Well, many, but one was this: that wolves, unlike us, live without hope. And what is most important in us, is what is left when time has taken our hope from us.

Mark Rowlands: We do spend a lot of our time obsessing about the future and obsessing about the past in the way that no other animal does. The drawback is I think, that we have a hard time making sense of our lives once we’re hooked into time in that sort of way. I think that is one of the drawbacks at least.

Alan Saunders: But we have a hard time making sense of our lives, but on the other hand we do have a project, which involves making sense of our lives. Brenin, the wolf, didn’t have any trouble with making sense of his life, because he just carried on being a wolf.

Mark Rowlands: Yes, because we’re what philosophers call temporal creatures, we experience time in a certain way, as a line stretching from the past into the future. We face a problem. And the problem is we know that there’s going to be an end to this line. And so then we have a fundamental choice to make: what is our stance going to be to the fact that there is an end to the line of our lives? And it seems to me we have two fundamental choices: either we tell stories to the effect that there isn’t in fact an end, that what we think of as the end is not in fact the end, there is something else; we can do that. Or we can live our lives in the acknowledgement that there will be an end.

Part of what I wanted to do certainly in the latter half of the book, was to try and show the ways in which making up stories about there not being an end, about death not being the end, doesn’t allow us to be what we are capable of being.

Listen to the interview & read the transcript

Reposted with permission from: ABC Radio National

Archive Fever by Lorena Allam

In audio, Australia & Oceania, books, history, humanities, information, interview, research, theory on September 24, 2013 at 00:29

From: Archive Fever by Lorena Allam, Hindsight, ABC Radio National, http://www.abc.net.au

Australia is leading the world in a new approach to archives. It is challenging traditional archivists to embrace a more multilateral approach, one which suggests many versions of the past. But what does this mean archives are about become? Do they describe our past or our future? If we are to believe in Archive Fever then we might find our archives produce our history as much as they record it.

Listen to the broadcast

Archive Fever is the title of a book by Jacques Derrida that has caused much debate around the world. Years later archivists and researchers are still disseminating its meaning. It came at a time when archives were just beginning to face the challenge of the digital age and so were ripe for an new definition. This new definition is still being debated, but so far it looks like it will involve archivists being more open about their practises, and institutions being more open about the gaps in their collections.

Modern archival theory and practise is based on organisational and government records. So the rules for archiving personal papers, oral histories, pictures, ephemera etc, are all adaptations from this dominant model. This is one reason why there are gaps. The histories of minority groups, indigenous communities, women, children and even sports stars, are all underrepresented in our national collections. These are big gaps, but there are also small gaps for instance when a correspondence suddenly breaks into a phone call. Even today archives are essentially about paper, and if the correspondents speak to each other then, the chances are, there’ll be a gap in the record, and a gap in our knowing, and a gap in the conclusions we draw from that knowing.

Reposted with permission from: ABC Radio National

Travels with Epicurus by Daniel Klein and Natasha Mitchell

In audio, Europe, North America, philosophy on August 8, 2013 at 05:45

From: Travels with Epicurus: living an authentic old age by Daniel Klein and Natasha Mitchell, Life Matters, ABC Radio National, http://www.abc.net.au

4384682-3x4-340x453For philosopher Daniel Klein the prospect of getting dental implants and maintaining his youthful smile set him thinking. Is it better to spend a precious year trying to extend the prime of his life, or to live an authentic old age, toothless grin and all? Daniel went on a journey to the Greek Island of Hydra, coupled with the teachings of Greek philosopher Epicurus, to seek out the best way to embrace his twilight years.

Daniel Klein is the author of many books and his latest is Travels with Epicurus, A journey to a Greek Island in Search of an authentic old age

Listen to the broadcast

Reposted with permission from: ABC Radio National

Gardens and philosophy by Damon Young

In audio, nature, philosophy on June 23, 2013 at 20:59

From:  Gardens and philosophy by Damon Young – Presented by Phillip Adams, Late Night Live, ABC Radio National, http://www.abc.net.au

4407498-1x1-460x460

Damon Young, Writer and philosopher, Honorary fellow at the University of Melbourne

Damon Young explores what he calls ‘one of literature’s most intimate relationships: authors and their gardens’.

Listen to the broadcast

Reposted with permission from: ABC Radio National

Music: The Open Goldberg Variations by Kimiko Ishizaka

In audio, music on May 20, 2013 at 20:09

The Open Goldberg Variations by Kimiko Ishizaka, http://www.opengoldbergvariations.org/

The Open Goldberg Variations by Kimiko Ishizaka are free to download and share. They are governed by the Creative Commons Zero license, which means that they are a part of the public domain. Visit the website to download.

Kimiko Ishizaka was the first of three child prodigies born to Junkichi and Ruth Ishizaka in Bonn, Germany.  At the age of four, she began studying piano with her mother, who would continue to be her teacher until 1995. In 2000, she completed her performer’s diploma exam with Professor Roswitha Gediga-Glombitza at the Hochschule für Musik Köln with the highest available marks. Further studies included masterclasses with Prof. Peter Feuchtwanger, Prof. Karl-Heinz Kämmerling, the Alban Berg Quartet, and the Amadeus Quartet.

From the early age of five, Ishizaka distinguished herself as a soloist and as a chamber performer, especially in the context of the Ishizaka Trio, which consisted of her and her younger brothers. In its 16 year history, the Ishizaka Trio participated in many important festivals (Schleswig Holstein Musikfestival, Festspiele Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Beethovenfest Bonn, Brauschweiger Kammermusikpodium, and the Rheingau Musikfestival), performed concerts in many countries (Japan, Italy, The Netherlands, Belgium, the U.S.A.), and took prizes in many renowned competitions, including:

  • The Menschenskinder prize from RTL (1995)
  • The Vittorio Gui International Chamber Music Competition
  • Three consecutive 1st prizes in the International Charles Hennen Competion in The Netherlands
  • 1st Prize in the 1998 Deutscher Musikwettbewerb (German Music Competition)

Visit Kimiko Ishizaka’s official website for more information.

A Romp Through the Philosophy of Mind with Marianne Talbot

In audio, humanities, philosophy, theory on March 21, 2013 at 12:28

From: A Romp Through the Philosophy of Mind with Marianne Talbot, University of Oxford Podcasts, http://podcasts.ox.ac.uk

The mind is a fascinating entity. Where, after all, would we be without it? But what exactly is it? These days many people believe the mind simply is the brain. Descartes would have disagreed profoundly. He recommended a dualism of substance. Modern philosophers are again finding various forms of dualism attractive because the problems with physicalism are so intractable. One such problem is whether the mind, like the brain, is located in space (specifically inside the head). But does philosophy have anything sensible to say about the mind? Surely today it is scientists we should be listening to? Come and find out why this is – and always will be – false.

Marianne Talbot was thrown out of school at 15. She came back to education at 26 when she took an Open University Foundation course during which she discovered philosophy. Transferring to London University Marianne took First Class Honours then went to Oxford University to do graduate work. She taught for Pembroke College, Oxford from 1987 – 1990, for Brasenose College, Oxford from 1990-2000, and has, since 2001, been director of studies in philosophy at Oxford University’s Department for Continuing Education. Two of Marianne’s podcasts (A Romp Through the History of Philosophy, and The Nature of Arguments) have been global number one on iTunes U. Her podcasts have received over 3 million downloads.

Listen to the podcasts

Reposted with permission from: University of Oxford Podcasts

A city for women only by Natasha Mitchell and Adel Abdel Ghafar

In Asia, audio, gender, human rights, politics, sexuality, society on November 5, 2012 at 21:16

From: A city for women only by Natasha Mitchell and Adel Abdel Ghafar, Life Matters, ABC Radio National, http://www.abc.net.au

A new women-only industrial city dedicated to female workers is set to be built in the so-called shrouded kingdom of the Middle-East: Saudi Arabia.

It may come as a surprise to some, given Saudi Arabia attracts much criticism from human rights groups for its systematic discrimination against women. Saudi women are subject to the kingdom’s strict customs which mean they are unable to vote, drive or sign a legal document.

So does the proposed development represent a move by the government toward achieving independence for women, or is there another incentive?

Listen to the broadcast

Reposted with permission from: ABC Radio National

Utopia’s second coming by Antony Funnell with Craig Bremner and Erik Olin Wright

In audio, government, history, philosophy, politics, society, technology, theory on October 27, 2012 at 20:01

From: Utopia’s second coming by Antony Funnell with Craig Bremner and Erik Olin Wright,  ABC Radio National, http://www.abc.net.au

Excerpt from Thomas Moore documentary: In 1535 Thomas Moore is brought to trial. He is an embarrassment to the King, a living opposition to state policies. Henry must make an example of Moore.

Antony Funnell: Poor old Thomas Moore. He was a man of religion, of principle and of literature. But he lost his head, of course, for not doing the King’s bidding. Now, if you ask me, what he should have got the chop for, in my humble opinion, was for giving the world one of its great and enduring frustrations; the idea of Utopia.

Craig Bremner: Utopia is not about an ideal location, it’s about the location of ideas. And what I mean by that is that we’ve become transfixed by the description that Utopia is somewhere and can be, in a sense, attained, missing the point that it is both presented…the very, very first version, the book that Thomas Moore wrote, presented as both an ideal location, but also a location that we don’t necessarily want. And its real function is the ideas that it brings back to the here and now.

Nicole Pohl: What we have seen, certainly after 2008, with the economic collapse and now with the economic crisis, across the Western world at least, people are picking up on the study of Utopia again and are trying to imagine different forms of society’s blueprints that are precisely not either socialism or communism or capitalism.

Listen to the broadcast

Reposted with permission from: ABC Radio National

The Panel: Utopian architecture by Fenella Kernebone with Professor Robert Fishman

In aesthetics, architecture, art, audio, Australia & Oceania, culture, Europe, history, interview, nature, North America, philosophy on October 2, 2012 at 07:07

From: The Panel: Utopian architecture by Fenella Kernebone with Professor Robert Fishman, By Design, ABC Radio National, http://www.abc.net.au

Since the end of the 19th century people have struggled to build better cities, free of the slums and smoke that were part and parcel of the industrial revolution. Architects saw that the industrialised world was one of enormous possibilities with room for visionary ideas to escape the problems of the day, be it a shortage of housing, urban decay or pollution. Their utopian Modernist dreams imagined cities in the sky and housing towers set amongst green landscapes.

As part of RN’s theme week about perfect worlds, we’re revisiting several of those dreams for urban utopias as imagined by four visionary architects: Frank Lloyd Wright; Le Corbusier; Walter Burley Griffin and Marion Mahony Griffin — the husband–wife team behind Canberra — as well as the town planner Ebenezer Howard, who created the garden city movement.

Listen to the broadcast

Reposted with permission from: ABC Radio National

 

Byrd Hale on Blues

In academia, audio, music on September 28, 2012 at 05:09

From: Byrd Hale on Blues – “Entitled Opinions (about Life and Literature)” with Robert Harrison, Stanford University

Listen to part 1 of the show

Listen to part 2 of the show

Byrd Hale, also known as Byrd of Paradise, has been Blues Director at KZSU 90.1 Stanford radio for fifteen years. For twenty years, Byrd has hosted the blues show “Blues with a Feelin’,” which can be heard live on KZSU 90.1 and at http://kzsu.stanford.edu/ on Saturdays from 9 am to noon. He also hosts a talk show entitled “The Lunch Special,” which can be heard on Mondays from noon to 3 pm.

Reposted with permission from: Entitled Opinions

How writing began with Maria Zijlstra and Professor Antonio Sagona

In archaeology, Asia, audio, civilisation, culture, history, interview, languages on September 19, 2012 at 03:52

From: How writing began with Maria Zijlstra and Professor Antonio Sagona, ABC Radio National, http://www.abc.net.au

The texts on the tablets, written in the Old Assyrian dialect of Akkadian, describe the Assyrians bringing textiles and tin to Anatolia on the backs of donkeys, and trading it with the locals for silver and gold. This letter is from Ashur-malik to his brother Ashur-idi complaining that, although winter has already come, he and his family have been left in Ashur without food, clothes or fuel. Lack of space obliged him to finish his letter on a small supplementary tablet. Often, as in this case, the tablet was encased in a clay envelope. These were sometimes inscribed with a summary of the contents and sealed by witnesses, using the traditional Mesopotamian cylinder seal rather than the local Anatolian stamp seal. Here the sender’s seal shows figures approaching a seated king with a bull-man at the end of the scene.

Listen to the broadcast

Reposted with permission from: ABC Radio National

Meeting Martha Nussbaum with Alan Saunders

In audio, humanities, interview, philosophy on August 31, 2012 at 03:52

 

From: Meeting Martha Nussbaum with Alan Saunders, The Philosopher’s Zone, ABC Radio National, http://www.abc.net.au

Alan Saunders: I’m interested that you talk about the relationship between ritual and the moral life. This is not an obvious connection, I think, that many people would make. They’d think that ritual is just doing one damn thing after the other every day and it is unconnected with morality which involves thought and consideration of what you’re doing.

Martha Nussbaum: Well, you know, I’ve always said and written that emotions are central to the moral life and that if we really reflect about what we are deeply attached to, that’s quite an important part of getting our moral life in order, because we all have deep and passionate attachments to people and things outside of ourselves that we don’t control. And so for me ritual is a time of stepping aside from the busy life with all its distractions. And that I think is a big part of it; it’s just getting into a space of contemplation. But then meditating on the deeper emotional attachments that human life contains: grief and loss and aspiration and joy. And I think ritual sticks around because like a great piece of music – and of course it includes music for me very prominently – it just has that capacity to touch us with the deeper connections and attachments that we have, and I think the shear repetition could, of course, be just rote, but it can also bring back memories. I mean, when you go to a Passover seder I think you think about freedom in a new way because you are remembering your childhood and you are remembering your connections to loved people you have lost. The very fact that you’re back there one year later in the same place with many but not all of the same people helps you think about what you care about.

Listen to the interview & read the transcript

Reposted with permission from: ABC Radio National

Denise Gigante on John Keats

In audio, literature, poetry, writers on May 20, 2012 at 10:19

 

Denise Gigante on John Keats – Entitled Opinions, Stanford University

Listen to the show

Denise Gigante is a professor in the English Department at Stanford University and teaches eighteenth and nineteenth-century British literature with a focus on Romanticism. Her books include “The Keats Brothers: The Life of John and George” (Harvard UP, 2011), “Life: Organic Form and Romanticism” (Yale UP, 2009), “The Great Age of the English Essay: An Anthology” (Yale UP, 2008),  “Taste: A Literary History” (Yale UP, 2005), and “Gusto: Essential Writings in Nineteenth-Century Gastronomy” (Routledge, 2005). She has published several essays, notably on Milton (Diacritics), Blake (Nineteenth-Century Literature), Coleridge (European Romantic Review), Keats (PMLA), Sartre and Beckett (Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net), Tennyson (NCL), Mary Shelley (ELH), and the philosopher Slavoj Zizek (New Literary History). She is currently working on a new book entitled The Book Madness: Charles Lamb’s Midnight Darlings in New York, which is forthcoming from Harvard University Press.

%d bloggers like this: